LV109SGluten-free pasta options are seemingly endless these days, but all brands are definitely not created equal. My favorite pasta is a quinoa and rice blend by Andean Dream. Quinoa is a super food so I like to include it in my diet whenever possible. However, Andean Dream does not make fettuccine and our favorite one from Celiac Specialties seems to have been discontinued. The pasta has been listed as ‘unavailable’ for well over a year on the bakery’s website and then one day it was replaced with another brand. So, my search for a new delicious gluten-free fettuccine has been ongoing for a while now.

My husband used to be a chef and one of his specialties was fettuccine alfredo. He made it for me when we were dating and all through our marriage. Then when we had to use gluten-free pasta and it just wasn’t the same. We tried around ten different brands and didn’t like any of the fettuccine pastas until we found the one from Celiac Specialties (when it was in stock). After going without a terrific fettuccine for the last year or so, and also going without our house specialty of fettuccine alfredo, we finally found a new delicious gluten-free fettuccine pasta.

The strangest thing about this new find is that the pasta is made from corn. I tried three 100% corn pasta brands that I didn’t like at all. So when a friend reviewed the Italian pasta brand, Le Veneziane, and I read that it was made from corn, I immediately wrote it off as not worth trying. Then I noticed several other online rave reviews for this same pasta and decided to risk trying it. If the money spent wasn’t worth it, it would be the first time in a long time I’d wasted money on bad tasting food.

The Gluten-Free Trading Company carries the pasta by Le Veneziane so I ordered the fettuccine along with my stock of LaTortilla Factory gluten-free tortillas. The pasta arrived oddly packaged. There were six little bird’s nests of pasta which means you have to cook each nest in full or break the pasta up to cook it. We guessed that three ‘nests’ was the right amount for us for dinner and that ended up being dead on. I cooked the pasta and then handed it over to my husband to make his special dish for the first time in a very long time. The pasta took on the alfredo sauce very well. We have found that sauces don’t always stick well to gluten-free pastas. The better the pasta quality, the better merging of pasta and sauce. Even so, there was a slight yellow color to the pasta, leaving me still skeptical about how it would taste.

There was no need for worry because the fettuccine alfredo made with La Veneziane pasta was the best we’ve had in almost four years! The pasta did not taste anything like the corn pasta we’d had before – or corn for that matter. Is the difference the corn? I always thought corn was corn but this pasta is made with corn that is grown not far from Venice. The soil is said to be exceptional there. Still, it’s shocking that the corn they use to make this pasta makes a product that tastes ten times better than all the other corn pastas we’vehad. I guess it doesn’t really matter why the pastas are so different. The pasta from Italy is truly exceptional and I’d proudly serve it to glutenoids any day. I’ll stick with the healthy Andean Dream for Macaroni but for my husband’s house specialty – and any other pasta dishes that call for fettuccine, it’s Le Veneziane for us from now on!

  • Le  Venziene pasta is also free of milk/casein, cholesterol, peanut, soy, tree nuts, and peanuts. It is also vegan and low fat.

Special thanks to Anne Steib for letting me know that this pasta was definitely worth trying. You were right on the money!