Gluten-Free Chips: Where to Find Them and What to Buy

potatochipsJust the name “potato chips” is a beacon of hope for those with Celiac who constantly crave salty snack foods. Made of crunchy fried goodness, potato chips were invented in 1853 by chef George Crum, who made them one day to spite a customer’s complaints about being served soggy potatoes. Today, chips are one food that, thankfully, come in many easy-to-find, gluten-free iterations. And almost all of them are available at your local grocery store (yes, even if its not a Whole Foods or other specialty store)! Here are a few of the best brands of readily available gluten-free chips around (keep in mind that there are many more where these came from in the gluten-free grocery guide):

Lay’s Gluten-Free Potato Chips. When most of us think of potato chips, Lay’s is the first to come to mind. Lucky for you, most flavors of these classic potato chips are gluten-free according to the Lay’s website. Gluten-free flavors include but are not limited to: Balsamic Sweet Onion, Cajun Herb & Spice, Cheddar & Sour Cream, Chile Limon, Classic, Dill Pickle, Garden Tomato & Basil, Hot & Spicy Barbecue, Light Original, Lightly Salted, and Kettle Cooked Sea Salt & Vinegar.

Kettle Brand Gluten-Free Chips. If you’re looking for a gourmet step up from Lay’s, check out any one

of Kettle Brand’s potato chips, which are processed in a gluten-free environment, free of all risk of cross-contamination. Kettle takes pride in using natural ingredients, making chips with absolutely no trans fats, and avoiding the use of GMO’s, or genetically modified foods. Flavors include Sweet Onion, Sea Salt & Vinegar, Tuscan, Honey Dijon, and more.

Food Should Taste Good Gluten-Free Tortilla Chips. Here at Triumph Dining, we couldn’t agree more! As it turns out, all this company’s chips are certified gluten-free by the Gluten Free Certification Organization. Examples include the Sweet Potato (enhanced by a hint of cane sugar), Jalapeno, and even Multigrain (made with flax, sunflower, and sesame seeds, in addition to

foodshouldtastegood

quinoa and other gluten-free grains).

Any Brand: Pure Corn Tortilla Chips are naturally gluten-free! You’ve got a good dip, but you need a good chip. And Triumph Dining’s choice for best gluten-free corn chip is:

Tostitos Natural Blue Corn (Naturally Gluten-Free)Tortilla Chips! Put them in some guacamole or fiesta dip (see recipe below) and crunch, crunch, crunch away. We love the wholesome taste of these blue chips as a side dish, for nachos, or for light snacking.

Bonus Recipe! Gluten-Free Fiesta Dip:

It’s simple, easy, and will keep you snacking all day long. Spread a layer of sour cream over a platter. Then, spread a layer of salsa over the sour cream. Next, sprinkle copious amounts of cheddar cheese over it all, and stick it in the oven until the cheese melts. The result is a dip so delicious that you won’t be able to leave it alone. Grab those gluten-free chips, because that dip isn’t going to eat itself!


30 thoughts on “Gluten-Free Chips: Where to Find Them and What to Buy”

  1. Most Utz potato chips and cheese puffs, doodles, etc. have Gluten Free on the bag. I’ve tried many without a problem. Only the Baked varieties seem not to be gluten free.

  2. Most Utz potato chips and cheese puffs, doodles, etc. have Gluten Free on the bag. I’ve tried many without a problem. Only the Baked varieties seem not to be gluten free.

  3. I have to vote against Kettle chips… I was repeatedly glutened by them, in particular the Jalapeno ones. It used to be ok but something changed about a year ago. I’m not convinced that they are properly vetting their suppliers enough to be 100% of gluten-free. And after how sick I got, I’m not touching their brand again.

  4. I have to vote against Kettle chips… I was repeatedly glutened by them, in particular the Jalapeno ones. It used to be ok but something changed about a year ago. I’m not convinced that they are properly vetting their suppliers enough to be 100% of gluten-free. And after how sick I got, I’m not touching their brand again.

  5. Newsflash, latest research shows that the gluten in corn causes reaction in a large percentage of Celiacs. Corn does have a different type of gluten. So I don’t think you should be promoting corn as “gluten free.” Ask a Celiac (me) who reacts to corn how he feels about it.

  6. Newsflash, latest research shows that the gluten in corn causes reaction in a large percentage of Celiacs. Corn does have a different type of gluten. So I don’t think you should be promoting corn as “gluten free.” Ask a Celiac (me) who reacts to corn how he feels about it.

  7. I would have to agree with Daniel as I am a celiac and am unable to eat corn. It has gluten in it as well so I don’t eat anything with corn in it. If you are a celiac and haven’t started to feel better I would suggest laying off the corn. But hay I have nothing against lays plain chips, they are a staple in my life.

  8. I would have to agree with Daniel as I am a celiac and am unable to eat corn. It has gluten in it as well so I don’t eat anything with corn in it. If you are a celiac and haven’t started to feel better I would suggest laying off the corn. But hay I have nothing against lays plain chips, they are a staple in my life.

  9. You’re mistaken; corn does not contain gluten. I’m sorry that you react badly to corn, but it would be a mistake to confuse this with a problem with gluten.

  10. You’re mistaken; corn does not contain gluten. I’m sorry that you react badly to corn, but it would be a mistake to confuse this with a problem with gluten.

  11. Unfortunately, there are cross-contamination issues with some corn products, e.g. machine-made tortillas. According to CSA’s Gluten-Free Product Listing, tortilla-making machines are commonly dusted with wheat flour. And this does not have to be listed on the label, as it is considered a manufacturing process.

  12. Unfortunately, there are cross-contamination issues with some corn products, e.g. machine-made tortillas. According to CSA’s Gluten-Free Product Listing, tortilla-making machines are commonly dusted with wheat flour. And this does not have to be listed on the label, as it is considered a manufacturing process.

  13. Another issue with chips and cross-contamination is the reach-in factor. In our family, there’s one celiac and three non-celiacs. If the non-celiacs were eating something with gluten in it (a sandwich, breaded chicken wings, a burrito, etc…) and they reach in the bag with wheat flour all over their fingers, then they contaminate the bag of chips for our one celiac.

    I think this happens at family gatherings and parties quite often. Sometimes it even happens in our own home. So sharing a bag of chips can often lead to being glutened. Marking items GF with permanent marker can help family members remember to wash hands and avoid contaminating things like a bag of chips.

    Just thought I’d share.

  14. Another issue with chips and cross-contamination is the reach-in factor. In our family, there’s one celiac and three non-celiacs. If the non-celiacs were eating something with gluten in it (a sandwich, breaded chicken wings, a burrito, etc…) and they reach in the bag with wheat flour all over their fingers, then they contaminate the bag of chips for our one celiac.

    I think this happens at family gatherings and parties quite often. Sometimes it even happens in our own home. So sharing a bag of chips can often lead to being glutened. Marking items GF with permanent marker can help family members remember to wash hands and avoid contaminating things like a bag of chips.

    Just thought I’d share.

  15. Lays STAX are GF and travel really well (they come in a tube similar to pringles). My girls LOVE them. You can seal up a tube or pour out a serving to keep from cross contamination. Also, my daughter also has type 1 diabetes and because the chips are usually not broken in the ‘tube’ container; measuring a serving is pretty easy.

  16. Lays STAX are GF and travel really well (they come in a tube similar to pringles). My girls LOVE them. You can seal up a tube or pour out a serving to keep from cross contamination. Also, my daughter also has type 1 diabetes and because the chips are usually not broken in the ‘tube’ container; measuring a serving is pretty easy.

  17. That is interesting what Jenna said above, regarding the Kettle Jalapeno potato chips. I had some 2 days ago, and I’m still sick! I suspected the chips, but upon reading this……sounds like that was the culprit!

  18. That is interesting what Jenna said above, regarding the Kettle Jalapeno potato chips. I had some 2 days ago, and I’m still sick! I suspected the chips, but upon reading this……sounds like that was the culprit!

  19. I agree with the Kettle Chips comments. I don’t believe they are gluten free. There are traces of gluten as my husband fell sick a few times after eating them. We figured it was something else the first few times (contaminated hands), but we’re now certain it is the chips. This applies to both the regular and salt & pepper flavor.

  20. I agree with the Kettle Chips comments. I don’t believe they are gluten free. There are traces of gluten as my husband fell sick a few times after eating them. We figured it was something else the first few times (contaminated hands), but we’re now certain it is the chips. This applies to both the regular and salt & pepper flavor.

  21. Lay’s products are mostly gluten free, also soy and dairy free. Read the label. I eat Ruffles. Wavy and baked Lay’s, and tranditional Lay’s potato chips. Also Food Should Taste Good chips – – I love the Olive flavor. I find a lot of ‘naturally” gluten free items are marked “Gluten-Free!” and then the price is jacked up. Look to regular food too and read the label. You will find a lot more than you thought was out there to eat. (Food labeling laws require allergens to be listed in plain language.) I contacted Frito-l;ay and they told me what is allergen free plus cited the labeling law. Another yummy if one has no corn allergy is Old Dutch Puff Corn. (If the bag says “Made in Canada,” don’t buy it – -this is per the Old Dutch people, who said the laws are different in Canada and there may be allergens in those made there.

    I am appalled at the number of mfg’s making a small fortune on “gluten free.” or such – – they leave something out and then charge as if this costs them, like the tuna at the coop that just has tuna, water and salt. Why is this so expensive? Costs more than the tuna with all the allergens in the supermarket???

    And why do coops, who were originally begun to bring people together to get good food at lower prices, now often more expensive than regular grocers? it’s like they think they are the “in” thing and that justifies outrageous prices – – $3.00 for a plain old bar of Castile soap that I can get at the grocer for $1.00 – – etc. (plus the extra gas to go there for it out of protest.)

    General Mills is now making Gluten free Bisquick, but I was outraged that compared to reg Bisquick the box was smaller and the price was (much) higher – – I do not believe the ingredients were that much more expensive, but I can’t swear to that, just irritated that I see this a lot.

    It seems to me that every time there is a special need, that is used to justify charging more for something or to trick people into thinking that they are actually getting something more for their money. Read labels, call manufacturers. We put pressure on them by doing this, and they are starting to listen – – witness thos who developed Lisinatti almond-based cheese and Blue Diamond’s Almond Breeze – – not to mention the Silk people who are also doing Almond milk for those with soy allergies! (Now if I could just find some cottage cheese without gluten, dairy or soy!)

    And, remember to have your pharmacist check all your meds. And one final word – – beware those who hear only “gluten” when you tell them you are allergic to gluten plus soy and dairy or something else. It’s like they hear gluten and stop thinking and listening, like the nutrition intern who slapped down a box of Rice crips cereal and told me I could eat that. It not only had gluten, but dairy and soy – – and she was not happy when I pointed this out. But, in my defense, I was hungry and dealing with those who were too lazy to do their jobs – – I was in the hospital and they got mad and told me, “hospitals aren’t set up for special diets.” It was easier to act like I was just being difficult. Unfortunately, we are the ones who have to protect ourselves, no matter how ill we are. Good luck to all of those, and bless those in our lives who truly help us!

  22. Lay’s products are mostly gluten free, also soy and dairy free. Read the label. I eat Ruffles. Wavy and baked Lay’s, and tranditional Lay’s potato chips. Also Food Should Taste Good chips – – I love the Olive flavor. I find a lot of ‘naturally” gluten free items are marked “Gluten-Free!” and then the price is jacked up. Look to regular food too and read the label. You will find a lot more than you thought was out there to eat. (Food labeling laws require allergens to be listed in plain language.) I contacted Frito-l;ay and they told me what is allergen free plus cited the labeling law. Another yummy if one has no corn allergy is Old Dutch Puff Corn. (If the bag says “Made in Canada,” don’t buy it – -this is per the Old Dutch people, who said the laws are different in Canada and there may be allergens in those made there.

    I am appalled at the number of mfg’s making a small fortune on “gluten free.” or such – – they leave something out and then charge as if this costs them, like the tuna at the coop that just has tuna, water and salt. Why is this so expensive? Costs more than the tuna with all the allergens in the supermarket???

    And why do coops, who were originally begun to bring people together to get good food at lower prices, now often more expensive than regular grocers? it’s like they think they are the “in” thing and that justifies outrageous prices – – $3.00 for a plain old bar of Castile soap that I can get at the grocer for $1.00 – – etc. (plus the extra gas to go there for it out of protest.)

    General Mills is now making Gluten free Bisquick, but I was outraged that compared to reg Bisquick the box was smaller and the price was (much) higher – – I do not believe the ingredients were that much more expensive, but I can’t swear to that, just irritated that I see this a lot.

    It seems to me that every time there is a special need, that is used to justify charging more for something or to trick people into thinking that they are actually getting something more for their money. Read labels, call manufacturers. We put pressure on them by doing this, and they are starting to listen – – witness thos who developed Lisinatti almond-based cheese and Blue Diamond’s Almond Breeze – – not to mention the Silk people who are also doing Almond milk for those with soy allergies! (Now if I could just find some cottage cheese without gluten, dairy or soy!)

    And, remember to have your pharmacist check all your meds. And one final word – – beware those who hear only “gluten” when you tell them you are allergic to gluten plus soy and dairy or something else. It’s like they hear gluten and stop thinking and listening, like the nutrition intern who slapped down a box of Rice crips cereal and told me I could eat that. It not only had gluten, but dairy and soy – – and she was not happy when I pointed this out. But, in my defense, I was hungry and dealing with those who were too lazy to do their jobs – – I was in the hospital and they got mad and told me, “hospitals aren’t set up for special diets.” It was easier to act like I was just being difficult. Unfortunately, we are the ones who have to protect ourselves, no matter how ill we are. Good luck to all of those, and bless those in our lives who truly help us!

  23. Lays products are NOT safe for celiacs to eat! Investigate the link that is provided, they say that all products, except for Lays STAX chips are manufactured on lines with products containing wheat and that some residue may remain. This doesn’t seem safe to me. I did email them a while back and ask them if they have so many products that are gluten free, why can’t they manufacture them on safe lines. They responded with news that they would have announcements in 2011 about gluten free products, so I believe they are working on this. In the meantime, I took all Lays products out of my daughter’s diet. And I’m really upset to hear about the kettle chip problem!

  24. I’m with a couple previous posters here regarding the Kettle Brand jalapeno chips. I ate a few this morning and didn’t feel well. Gave them another try this afternoon and I know I’ve been glutened. I feel terrible. Something in them has gluten!

  25. I cannot tolerate Kettle brand chips. I’ve tried the Salt and Pepper, the sea salt and the Unsalted version over the past year. I always become ill. I have just emailed the company and I urge others to do the same. There is gluten in their products- it may be a very small amount- but it’s there.

  26. I also agree with the numerous others above…. Kettle Brand has Gluten in there somewhere. Maybe it’s in the processing, maybe it’s cross contamination…I don’t know – But it’s in there for sure.

    I was excited to find their Sea Salt variety ’cause it is made with sea salt and I react poorly to table salt. However…. Every time I’ve tried to eat them, I have become horribly ill in a way I only do with Gluten… The vomitting part is really fun =s. Good times.

  27. I have trouble trusting the bigger brand names, for fear of contamination in their giant warehouses. Smaller brands and labels are my preferred chip of choice and when I have time I make my own. It can be really simple, like this recipe I found here

    Maire

  28. Kettle chips are beutifull but for 1 problem, only 1 flavour is true non gluten, i was on there site reading ingreedients not 2 mins befor posting this.I was looking for my wife and she wasnt suprised at all, i was uterly disapointed but hey malt is natural and in the true european diet Gluten is rife

  29. btw people complaining about kettle chips please read there ingreedients more with more thought, its right there for all to see why they have gluten, i dont want to patronise but please learn the ingreedients to the ingreedient.

  30. ok, im simply retracting the previous 2 posts as i have read this article more clearly..
    Kettle Brand Gluten-Free Chips. If you’re looking for a gourmet step up from Lay’s, check out any one

    of Kettle Brand’s potato chips, which are processed in a gluten-free environment, free of all risk of cross-contamination.
    To that comment alone BS..

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