Opinion Poll: Is Mainstream Media Coverage of Gluten-Free Good or Bad?

Yesterday at 7am, CNN’s food blog, Eatocracy, published an article about gluten (and gluten-free!) on its front page. On the same morning, 1.3 million readers extracted a gluten-free special interest report from the folds of their Chicago Tribunes.

A few weeks ago, Michelle wrote a post on the recent trendiness of the gluten-free diet (check it out to see a video of the Old Spice Guy admitting his tribulations with the gluten-free diet), and Emily covered The Wall Street Journal’s well-intentioned attempt to set the gluten-free record straight.

Here at Triumph, we’re torn about whether all of this coverage is good or bad, and we’ve been bickering about it for weeks. We know that all the hype is giving us more gluten-free options (even the Today show featured gluten-free cupcakes!), but what is it doing to our potential for being glutened? Will we be able to convince restaurants to be extra fastidious in preparing our gluten-free meals, when someone at the next table just claimed to be gluten-free and then asked for soy sauce? Or, will that soy sauce automatically be gluten-free, because it was requested so many times?

There are a couple of different outcomes to this sudden outburst of gluten-free media coverage and celebrity attention (from The Old Spice Guy, Gwenyth Paltrow…maybe more? Stay tuned for next week’s “Celiac on the Red Carpet” post!), and we want to know how you feel about it. Help us settle our in-house score by telling us: Do you think the mainstream media coverage of gluten-free is good or bad?

Share your opinion in the poll, and feel free to expand on your position (or just vent) in our comments section!

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6 thoughts on “Opinion Poll: Is Mainstream Media Coverage of Gluten-Free Good or Bad?”

  1. I am glad you posted this poll and article today. I recently started having mixed feelings about all of the hype around gluten-free trendiness. Now that celebs are touting gluten-free products as the next big thing, it looks like being gluten-free is the new “it” way of life.

    As a life long person with Celiac Disease (diagnosed in 1981), I am excited about the recent press of Celiac Disease and the flood of gluten-free products. On the flip side, I am slightly bothered by the bandwagon everyone seems to be jumping on for the wrong reasons… most outstanding in the celebrity sphere. Here is my blog posting from today at Gluten-Free Fun. Coincidental timing with your Trimuph Dining post today!

    http://glutenfreefun.blogspot.com/2010/10/gluten-free-celebrity-product.html

  2. I am glad you posted this poll and article today. I recently started having mixed feelings about all of the hype around gluten-free trendiness. Now that celebs are touting gluten-free products as the next big thing, it looks like being gluten-free is the new “it” way of life.

    As a life long person with Celiac Disease (diagnosed in 1981), I am excited about the recent press of Celiac Disease and the flood of gluten-free products. On the flip side, I am slightly bothered by the bandwagon everyone seems to be jumping on for the wrong reasons… most outstanding in the celebrity sphere. Here is my blog posting from today at Gluten-Free Fun. Coincidental timing with your Trimuph Dining post today!

    http://glutenfreefun.blogspot.com/2010/10/gluten-free-celebrity-product.html

  3. All one need do is to take a look at some of the responses to the articles from folks who know nothing about health to see it is hurting us. I have also need more products in regular grocery stores that seem questionable to me. I think we are in for more of a fight. At the same time, with things being more public, there may be more of a possibility that we will be able to be heard more clearly.

  4. All one need do is to take a look at some of the responses to the articles from folks who know nothing about health to see it is hurting us. I have also need more products in regular grocery stores that seem questionable to me. I think we are in for more of a fight. At the same time, with things being more public, there may be more of a possibility that we will be able to be heard more clearly.

  5. I think it’s a mixed bag. I appreciate that fewer people look at me weird for requesting gluten free food and I’m glad I no longer have to explain to EVERYONE what gluten free is in general terms. However, I think the downside is potential for cross contamination and is why I think we need more products that are will to certify themselves gluten free or not. Something can have no gluten containing ingredients, but if those ingredients are cross contaminated in production, I’m still going to get sick from eating that product.
    For me the end result is that I’m moving away from products that would even need the gluten free labeling. Vegetables, fruits, meats, dairy. In other words, whole foods. Less processing. On the whole, I think it’s better for me any way.

  6. I think it’s a mixed bag. I appreciate that fewer people look at me weird for requesting gluten free food and I’m glad I no longer have to explain to EVERYONE what gluten free is in general terms. However, I think the downside is potential for cross contamination and is why I think we need more products that are will to certify themselves gluten free or not. Something can have no gluten containing ingredients, but if those ingredients are cross contaminated in production, I’m still going to get sick from eating that product.
    For me the end result is that I’m moving away from products that would even need the gluten free labeling. Vegetables, fruits, meats, dairy. In other words, whole foods. Less processing. On the whole, I think it’s better for me any way.

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