Kohlrabi I thought maybe today we’d talk about kohlrabi.

Why? Well, mostly because I like it. I’ve been on a bit of a kick lately – it’s a little early in the season, but the stuff is generally available – and thought you might enjoy a kohlrabi kick of your own.

If you’ve never had it before, have you seen it in your local grocery store? You might see a picture like this one, or you might see it with the leaves chopped off. You might see it green, or maybe purple.

Whichever way, it’s a great, gluten-free source of potassium, fiber, Thiamin, Folate, Magnesium and Phosphorus, Vitamin C, Vitamin B6, Copper and Manganese.

Yum! But what to do with it once you buy it?

My favorite way to eat kohlrabi is probably the most boring. First thing is to peel it – the outside is a bit too tough to eat, so get your paring knife out. Then, I like to slice it fairly thin, put it on a plate, and sprinkle it lightly with some sort of tasty, fancy salt. That’s it. Snooze.

Kohlrabi is kind of cabbagey in taste, but it’s got a nice crisp bite and a certain delicateness to it – and I think eating it simply allows all the good parts to shine. However, it has an affinity for dairy-based spreads like tzatiki and is certainly hearty enough to stand for some dipping.

If you want to get a little fancier, here are some gluten-free kohlrabi recipes you could check out:

Kohlrabi-carrot salad with peanut dressing from Table Matters

The Prairieland CSA offers ideas for turning kohlrabi into a gratin, roasting it and stewing it. Just be sure to use a GF flour in the gratin!

• Farmgirl Fare has an idea for kohlrabi puree that uses both the leaves and the root

• From the ever-charming Chocolate and Zucchini, a fresh kohlrabi-lentil salad

• You could pickle your kohlrabi with some carrots, like Becky from the Root Cellar’s Garden

How do you like to eat kohlrabi? Do you like to eat it at all?