Oh man. Easter kind of snuck up on us this year. Did you have a nice one? I sure hope so.

Now, I saw a lot of buzz on the gluten-free blogosphere from parents who were considering candy-free Easter baskets — which is pretty neat. Still, I’m willing to bet that at least two or three of you went the traditional route and are now faced with a dilemma: what to do with all the leftover Easter candy?

Of course, the short answer is: eat it, you silly goose! Chocolate is delicious. But everyone knows that there can be too much of a good thing — and that’s where these neat ideas come in handy. There are plenty of ways to take your gluten-free Easter candy and reimagine it in new and delicious (and still gluten-free!) ways:

The prettiest solution I saw was an elegant solution for working out some post-holiday stress: Easter Candy Bark from Cooking Channel TV’s blog. The photos are super-pretty because of the white chocolate bunnies that got melted down into the base of the bark, but let’s be real: chocolate of all colors is a beautiful thing, and these would look just as nice with a milk or a dark. Or you could get fancy and swirl different chocolates together: melt each one in a separate double-boiler (or carefully in a microwave), and then pour them onto the baking sheet in a neato swirl pattern (like this one from Inspired Taste, or more like you’d do a marble pound cake).

CakeSpy also had a lot of great ideas, including an Easter Trifle — simply layer whatever you’ve got on hand into parfait glasses: whipped cream or frosting, gluten-free muffin/cookie crumbs, jelly beans, bits and pieces of bunnies, maybe even some fruit (at which point it will be come a healthy parfait).

SheKnow.com has quite a few recipes — all of which would require modification to be gluten-free — but their recipe for Peeps Rice Crispies Treats is super-easy and would get rid of quite a lot of Peeps in one fell swoop. Just be sure to use a gluten-free rice cereal!

Of course, you could also use your Peeps for educational purposes. The good folks at Peep Research have already learned quite a bit about our marshmallowey friends, and I highly suggest you check out their studies on solubility and extreme temperatures  for inspiration when planning your own experiments.

As a last, boring idea: you could always freeze your leftover Easter candy. Less fun, but probably better for your teeth.

Did you go overboard with Easter candy? What are your favorites, and what are you going to do with what’s left?