Israel can be a great place to eat gluten-free food, but it’s (maybe) about to get even better for the  country’s 30,000+ celiacs.

Last week, ynetnews.com reports, the Knesset approved a bill that would support celiac patients in a number of ways: the patients would be provided with some form of financial support each month, and the cost of gluten-free foods would also be reduced so that gluten-free bread would not cost more than its gluten-full alternative.

The bill also suggested that companies who produce gluten-free food would have their income tax capped at 25%, to incentivize them to enter / stay in the market.

Of course, although the Health Committee has moved the bill to its next stage, a preliminary reading, it has not yet passed and faces significant hurdles. The Finance Ministry disapproves of the high cost of the bill, and the Justice Ministry opposes the concept of singling out a single disease for legislation.

The Ministry of Industry, Trade and Labor also objects on the grounds that the law will be unenforceable and prices cannot be supervised.

In order to pass, the bill needs the support of at least 50 members of the Knesset, a number that some say is attainable.

Regardless of which way the legislation decides, we’ll keep you posted. In the meantime, tell us: what sort of laws would you like to see, that would benefit the celiac community and still be fiscally responsible?