Celiac and Autism | Triumph Dining

286668700_640There are plenty of articles out there which talk about a link between celiac disease and autism. Many autistic children show a vast improvement in symptoms when they stick to a strictly gluten-free diet.

Interestingly though, a new nationwide study from Sweden claims that there is no link between celiac disease and autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

In the study, people who were diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder were no more likely to be diagnosed with celiac disease than people without ASD. Click to continue reading »

Scottish Kids With Record Levels of Celiac

Earlier this month, we brought news of research from Australia suggesting that celiac disease appears to be a lot more common that previously thought. Now, researchers in Scotland have also found that the number of children with celiac disease may have reached record levels.

Scientists have discovered that celiac disease now affects six times more children living in Scotland than it did in 1990.

Researchers based at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Edinburgh found that the rate of children being newly diagnosed with celiac disease increased from 1.7 per 100,000 children in 1990-1994 to 11.8 per 100,000 in 2005-2009.

The team considered a number of possible reasons for this rise. Factors could include changing patterns of childhood infections as a result of ongoing improvements in healthcare, greater awareness of celiac disease and it’s symptoms or simply the result of better and more rigorous testing.

Peter Gillett, of Edinburgh University’s department of child life and health thinks there is more behind this increase than heightened awareness and better testing.

“It also confirms the need to look further at factors influencing why we are seeing more patients with coeliac disease.”

Why do you think more and more people are being diagnosed with celiac disease? Is is simply better awareness and testing or something more?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-24124878

 

Post authored by Laura (Gluten Free Traveller) http://glutenfreetraveller.com/

Djokavic Writes About Gluten Free Diet

djokovic-gluten-freeWe’ve known for a while that tennis player, Novak Djokovic, follows a gluten-free diet. He became the world’s Number One player three years ago after going gluten-free and now he has a new book in which he shares his diet and training secrets.

His new book, “Serve to Win: The 14-Day Gluten-Free Plan for Physical and Mental Excellence”, talks about the success he achieved whilst following a gluten-free and low-sugar diet. Whilst his nutritional secrets include quite the variety of things from drinking plenty of warn water throughout the day to eating Manuka honey from New Zealand, the biggest change for him was removing gluten from his diet. Click to continue reading »

Is Celiac Even More Common Than We First Thought?

New research suggests that celiac disease could be even more common than previously thought. It is currently believed that celiac disease affects around 1 in 100 people but a new Australian study suggests that the number affected could be more like one in 60 Australian women and one in 80 men.

Researchers led by Walter and Eliza Hall and scientists from Barwon Health and Deakin University developed a new kind of diagnosis test to screen for celiac disease. This screening process includes the usual antibody test but also adds a genetic test which looks for two key genetic markets, which are carried by 99.6% of people with celiac disease.

Results of the first study to assess the prevalence of celiac disease in Australians showed that 56% of the population carry one of the two known genetic markers associated with the autoimmune disorder. We must remember however that whilst a huge percentage of the population may have a genetic predisposition to the disease, not everyone will go on to develop it.

More than 2700 people took part in this decade-long study. Initial testing showed that whilst 37% of the people were genetically predisposed to celiac disease, just one person has been diagnosed. On repeat testing a decade later, six more people had been diagnosed; still a very small number compared with the number of people who probably have the disease.

“About one in 40 who carry the genetic markers will go on to develop coeliac disease,” said  gastroenterologist Dr Tye-Din. “There is a lot of coeliac disease out there but a large amount isn’t being picked up by doctors in the community.”

Very interesting research and I look forward to further studies on the prevalence of celiac disease in other countries, including the US. Could the future see a world where one in 60 women and one in 80 men have celiac disease…

http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/coeliac-disease-much-more-prevalent-than-thought-study-shows-20130828-2spel.html

Gluten-Free On Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives

Last week, my absolute favorite restaurant in San Francisco, and maybe even the world, was featured on the Guy Fieri show, Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives!

Pica Pica is a 100% gluten-free restaurant with three locations in the Bay Area. Adriana López Vermut and her father, Leopoldo López Gil, started Pica Pica as a way to express their love for Venezuelan cookery and the desire to share their native food with people here in the Bay Area. Their food is spectacular!

Adriana shared with Fieri and his viewers, how some of the restaurant’s most popular dishes are prepared and cooked. He thought the dishes were outstanding and he was right.

After my first arepa, I fell head over heels in love with this wonderful restaurant. The flavors which jump out at every bite are like nothing I’ve tasted before. One of their most popular dishes, the Arepa Pabellón, is a grilled corn pocket filled with shredded beef, sweet plantains, black beans and quasi fresco. My mouth is watering as I write this!

It’s always exciting to see gluten-free companies and restaurants featured on popular TV shows as it helps to raise awareness of celiac disease and gluten-free eating. Pica Pica is the perfect example of a restaurant which not only caters but cares about the gluten-free community. Everything on their menu and in their kitchen is 100% gluten-free and many of their goodies are also dairy free. It also shows that gluten-free definitely doesn’t have to mean taste-free. Gluten-free can be wonderful!

To find out more about Pica Pica, check out their website or visit one of their Bay Area locations.

http://www.picapica.com/

Post authored by Laura (Gluten Free Traveller) http://glutenfreetraveller.com/

Consumer Reaction to FDA’s Definition of Gluten-Free in Food Labeling

News of the FDA defining gluten-free in food labeling has received a lot of media play since it was announced earlier this month.

For those of you who may have missed it, the net net is that the US Food and Drug Administration published a new regulation which defines the term “gluten-free” for voluntary food labeling. This provides a uniform standard to help the roughly 3 million Americans who have celiac disease. The full announcement can be found here.

The FDA requires that, in order to use the term “gluten-free” on its label, a food must meet all of the requirements of the definition, including that the food must contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten. The rule also requires foods with the claims “no gluten,” “free of gluten,” and “without gluten” to meet the definition for “gluten-free.”

Consumer feedback has been overwhelmingly positive. However, 20PPM is still a real health risk for those with acute gluten allergies. Consumers are also asking how the FDA will regulate those 20PPM. Will every product be consistently checked for gluten? Are products allowed to be made in a non-dedicated gluten-free facility and still earn the gluten-free label?

Here at Triumph Dining we’re excited about the move forward by the FDA. What are your thoughts?

Add Whoopie Pies to List of Delectable Gluten-Free Goodies!

533979_465523490184379_1655917906_nThere seems to be no better impetus towards delicious gluten-free baked goods than a mother’s effort towards normalcy for her child. That’s how Hannah Balliet developed her gluten-free whoopie pies that earned her a spot on Lifetime’s cooking competition, “Supermarket Stars.”

Balliet’s son was diagnosed with a disorder similar to Tourette syndrome, resulting in facial tics that were relieved by muscle relaxants prescribed by his doctors. Unfortunately, the medication left her young son very lethargic, hindering his ability to act like an average first-grader. Balliet then began experimenting with a gluten-free diet, both for her son’s disorder and her own symptoms of lupus. Fortunately, after just a few weeks, she, herself, was less achy, while her son’s facial tics completely disappeared, encouraging her and her son to stay on the gluten-free diet.

The only hiccup to their new diet was the lack of gluten-free goodie options that were close to their gluten-filled counterparts. All the products seemed too dense or crumbly, and her son was embarrassed to bring gluten-free products into his classmates for his birthday. Balliet then came up with the idea to experiment with a gluten-free treat that kids may not have tried before. Instead of trying to make a gluten-free cake, brownie, or cookie that kids would scrutinize as compared to the gluten-filled version, Balliet started experimenting with whoopie pie recipes because they are so unique, and many eight year-olds may not have tried them before. Click to continue reading »

Squat and Gobble Gluten-Free Crepe Contest

If you live in San Francisco, you’ve probably heard of Squat and Gobble. They are a chain with five locations across the city.

Squat and Gobble sell lots of gluten-containing dishes such as crepes, burgers and sandwiches so they aren’t known to be the most celiac friendly of restaurants, although they do offer some gluten-free items on both lunch and dinner menus.

Known best for it’s savory and dessert crepes, Squat and Gobble are sponsoring a recipe contest for customers to create a fantastic gluten-free crepe which they can use across all of their stores.

Applicants are encouraged to use whichever filling they like in their crepe but chefs would like a fantastic, great tasting gluten-free crepe that can be used with all of the restaurants crepe fillings.

If you’re interested, check out out the rules on the Squat and Gobble website. The winner will receive $300 and dinner for two once a month for an entire year.

Happy Crepe Making!

http://www.squatandgobble.com/about/glutenfreecrepe

Celiac Disease Center Opens on Long Island

stony-brook-childrens-300x130Long Island’s Stony Brook Children’s Hospital has opened a new Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity Center. They specialize in diagnosing and treating children who suffer from celiac disease and gluten sensitivities.

The team is led by pediatric gastroenterologists and also includes highly trained nurse practitioners and a registered dietician. Having all of these people with years or expertise and experience of treating children with celiac disease in the one place makes it greatly accessible for patients. In this facility, patients and their families can receive help with diagnosis, treatment, management and support during the often challenging transition to a strict gluten-free diet. Click to continue reading »

Glutino Keeps the Gluten-Free Goodies Coming!

Instant-Pancake-MixGlutino products come to the rescue again for the gluten intolerant and celiacs alike with the release of a gluten-free pancake mix! Their new instant mix is packaged in a portable bottle, only requiring the addition of water to make a quick, easy, delicious and SAFE gluten-free breakfast!

Glutino’s motto is to “live fully” with a life free from “can’t” and “don’t.” Their products strive to provide safe meal options to people living a gluten-free lifestyle, whatever their reason is for cutting out the gluten. Their facilities are dedicated to staying gluten-free, so that no celiac has to worry about possible cross contaminants or dangerous additives. Moreover, most of their Gluten-Free Pantry mixes and all of their premium breads are dairy and casein free as well, which is a common problem among the gluten intolerant. Click to continue reading »